Myriam Kanoun-Boulé
Phone: + (351) 239 855 243
e-mail: mkb@ci.uc.pt
Category: Post-doctoral Fellow
Department: Centre for Functional Ecology
Direct URL for this page: http://cfe.uc.pt/MyriamKanoun-Boule
clique para ver a imagem ampliada
Academic Achievements
• Plant biomarkers to realistic and chronic tropospheric ozone pollution, model of ecophysiological plant response to ozone stress • The role of plant-fungi mycorrhizal interactions in plant trace metals tolerance: case study of Erica andevalensis from São Domingos copper mine (Portugal) • Trace metal tolerance/accumulation in terrestrial and aquatic plant species from uranium and trace metal contaminated areas, potential for soil and water phytoremediation
Projects
1. “Physiological Mechanisms of Copper Tolerance in Erica andevalensis: the role of Plant-Fungi Interactions” It is well established that mycorrhizal fungi can enhance trace metal tolerance of their host plant. However, the majority of studies on plant-fungus-heavy metal interactions essentially focused on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which led to a lack of knowledge regarding to the role of endomycorrhiza, especially the ericoid mycorrhizal fungi after the family name. This 3 years project aims at identifying the role of ericoid mycorrhizal fungi in the trace metal tolerance of E. andevalensis, an endemic species from the Iberian Peninsula, which grows naturally on the abandoned copper mine of São Domingos (Portugal). For this purpose, several ericoid mycorrhizal fungi from E. andevalensis roots will be isolated and cultured. Molecular identification of the isolates will be performed and their tolerance to trace metals will be assessed in order to select the main relevant fungi. Their inoculation to sterile cultivated E. andevalensis seedlings will allow determining the role of symbiosis interactions on E. andevalensis response to copper stress. The comparison of copper tolerance between inoculated and non-inoculated plants will be assessed through the analyses of several ecophysiological parameters known to be affected by a copper exposition or related to heavy metal transport and accumulation (e.g. respiration, photosynthesis, anti-oxidative enzymes activities, lipid peroxidation, membrane leakage, phytochelatins synthesis, trace metal uptake…). 2.“Ecophysiological processes in accumulator / excluder macrophytes growing in trace metal contaminated areas” Since the beginning of the XXth century, human activities have lead to the widespread contamination of air, soil and water with trace metals and have turned it into one of the most relevant environmental problems. The aquatic systems often act as a final receptacle for many metals. Mining activity is one of the main sources of trace metal pollution and the metal concentration in river waters can be increased several thousand folds by effluents from mining wastes. During the last two decades, phytoremediation of mine drainage water using macrophytes species has been receiving increasing interest. Elevated concentrations of heavy metals in soils or water may present an important selection force that can lead to genetically distinct plant populations which are specifically adapted to local extreme conditions. Such tolerant ecotypes may present a relevant potential for phytoremediation. The main goals of this starting project is to assess the trace metal tolerance and uptake capacity of several metalo-tolerant macrophyte species growing naturally in trace metal contaminated mine drainage in Portugal as well as to understand the ecophysiolgogical basis of this tolerance.
  1. Kanoun-Boule, Myriam; Vicente, Joaquim A. F.; Nabais, Cristina; Prasad, M. N. V.; Freitas, Helena (2009) Ecophysiological tolerance of duckweeds exposed to copper. Aquatic Toxicology. 91, 1, 1-9. (see details) ISI paper
    Link: doi:10.1016/j.aquatox.2008.09.009
  2. Bandeira de Albuquerque M., Kanoun-Boulé M., Freitas H., Prasad M.N.V. (2008) Erica andevalensis - Potential use for phytoremediation of the abandoned copper mine of São Domingos, Portugal. Proceedings Of The Joint Conference Of The 6th International Acida Sulfate Soil Conference And The Acid Rock Drainage Symposium. 20/23 (see details)
  3. Kanoun M., Goulas P., Biolley J.P. (2003) Describing and modelling ozone-dependent variation in flavonoid content of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Cv. Bergamo) leaves: a particular dose-response relationship analysis. Functional Plant Biology (formerly Australian Journal Of Plant Physiology). 30, 561-570 (see details)
  4. Biolley J.P., Kanoun M., Goulas P. (2002) The response of vacuolar phenolic content of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Cv. Bergamo) to a chronic ozone exposure: questions and hypothesis. : . Functional Plant Biology. 29, 1-11 (see details)
  5. Kanoun, M., Goulas, P., Basseres, A., Biolley, J.P. (2002) Ozone-induced oxidation of Rubisco: from an ELISA quantification to putative pathways leading to oxidizing mechanisms. Functional Plant Biology (formerly Australian Journal Of Plant Physiology). 29, 1357-1363 (see details)
  6. Kanoun, M., Goulas, P., Basseres, A., Biolley, J.P. (2002) Ozone-induced oxidation of Rubisco: from an ELISA quantification to putative pathways leading to oxidizing mechanisms. Functional Plant Biology (formerly Australian Journal Of Plant Physiology). 29, 1357-1363 (see details)
  7. Kanoun M., Jubqua M., Goulas P., Biolley J.P. (2001) Effect of a chronic and moderate ozone pollution on the phenolic pattern of bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Cv. Nerina): relation with visible injury and biomass production. Biochemical Systematics And Ecolgy. 29, 443-457 (see details)
  8. JUNQUA M., BIOLLEY J.P., PIE S., KANOUN M., DURAND R., GOULAS P. (2000) In vivo occurence of carbonyl residues in Phaseolus vulgaris proteins as a direct consequence of a chronic ozone stress. Plant Physiol. Biochem.. 38, 853-861 (see details)
  1. Kanoun-Boulé M., Bandeira de Albuquerque M., Nabais C., Freitas H. (in press) Copper as an Environmental contaminant: Phytotoxicity and Human Health Implications. In: Trace Elements: Nutritional Benefits, Environmental Contamination, and Health Implications. John Wiley and Sons, Inc.. (see details)
  1. Kanoun, M. (2002) Impact de l’ozone sur le végétal : modification du métabolisme phénolique et altération oxydative de la Rubisco chez Phaseolus vulgaris L. / Ozone impact on vegetation: phenolic metabolism modification and oxidative alteration of Rubisco in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Pau (France). - University of Pau. (see details)
  1. Kanoun-Boulé M., Vicente J., Freitas H. (2006) Ecophysiological responses of ecotypes of Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrrhiza to trace metal exposure. (see details)
  2. Kanoun-Boulé M., Bandeira de Albuquerque M., Freitas H. (2005) Trace metal tolerance of Erica andevalensis: a potential for phytomanagement of degraded mining soils. (see details)
  3. Kanoun-Boulé M., Bandeira de Albuquerque M., Freitas H. (2005) Trace metal tolerance of Erica andevalensis: a potential for phytomanagement of degraded mining soils. (see details)
  4. Kanoun M., Goulas P., Basseres A., Biolley J.P. (2001) A new ELISA assay for measuring ozone-induced carbonyls in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. (see details)
  5. Biolley J.P., Kanoun M., Basseres A., Goulas P. (2001) Assessment of ozone pollution impact on plants using oxidative modifications of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). (see details)
  6. Biolley J.P., Kanoun M., Junqua M., Goulas P. (1998) Elicitation of phytoalexins in bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv Bergamo) by a moderate chronic ozone stress. (see details)
  7. Biolley J.P., Kanoun M., Goulas P. (1997) Effect of long-term exposure to realistic ozone concentrations on the phenolic accumulation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves. (see details)